THE LAVINE FELLOWSHIP

The Better Angels Lavine Fellowship Program is a new component of the Library of Congress Lavine/Ken Burns Prize for Film program. The Lavine Fellowship is made possible by The Better Angels Society and Jeannie and Jonathan Lavine through the Crimson Lion Lavine Family Foundation. The fellowship is for promising filmmakers whose films are not selected as finalists for the Lavine Prize, but demonstrate the potential for excellence. With a special emphasis on film projects telling the stories of America’s diversity, the filmmakers will receive mentorship, guidance, and advice from a panel of expert filmmakers on the film projects they submit to the Library of Congress Lavine/Ken Burns Prize for Film. 

The Better Angels Lavine Fellowship will provide mentorship for 5 filmmakers per year. All applicants to the Library of Congress Lavine/Ken Burns Prize for Film will be considered automatically for the fellowship. No additional application materials necessary.

Learn more about how to apply for this year’s Prize here.

2020 Lavine Fellow Films

Fannie Lou Hamer's America

FANNIE LOU HAMER’S AMERICA

Mississippi sharecropper-turned-civil-rights-activist, Fannie Lou Hamer, is known for her  powerful speeches, soul-stirring songs and impassioned pleas for equal rights. In this film, she tells her own story – in her own words – through archival audio footage & rarely seen television  appearances recorded throughout her political and humanitarian career.
Kansas City Dreamin'

KANSAS CITY DREAMIN’

From the evolution of jazz in the 1930’s, to present day popular music. This film shows Kansas  City’s importance to American music. Featuring interviews with Kansas City natives: Bobby Watson, Janelle Monáe and Tech N9ne. With segments on area legends like Charlie Parker,  Count Basie, Big Joe Turner, and others.

Soul Sisters

SOUL SISTERS

Patti Henley & Brenda Lee Eager are two talented singers from the golden age of rock/soul and  R&B. Soul Sisters is about their lives: first working for Martin Luther King/Jesse Jackson’s  Operation Breadbasket. They become the “Voice of the Movement”. Now they bring powerful  messages about Black History to schoolchildren.

Home from School

HOME FROM SCHOOL: THE CHILDREN OF CARLISLE

In 2017, a delegation of Northern Arapaho tribal members travels from Wyoming to  Pennsylvania to retrieve remains of three children who died at Carlisle Indian Industrial school in  the 1880s. It’s a journey into the troubled history of Indian boarding schools, and a quest to heal  generational wounds.

Invisible Warriors

INVISIBLE WARRIORS: AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN IN WORLD WAR II

During World War II, 600,000 African American “Rosie the Riveters” work in industry and  government for the first time. These “Greatest Generation” heroines overcome racism and sexism  to create employment opportunities for future generations of Black women.